When I do charity events dressed as Batgirl, all the children of color are absolutely overjoyed. They literally embrace me and I can see them realize that their own race and skin color is not a hindrance to their creativity, as everything they see and experience has been telling them ever since they were old enough to process media.
The white children are hesitant and some attempt to quiz me or insist that I’m not ‘right’ or ‘real’. They are repeating what they have been told and what they have seen all their lives. I explain that Batman believes that anyone can be a hero if they are a good person and work hard, no matter what they look like. So of course Batgirl and Robin can be Black or Chinese or Spanish or anything, because that doesn’t change who they are.
The kids accept this and by the end of the event we’re all holding hands and talking about video games. I think representation is more important than ‘accuracy’ and I won’t be involved with an organization that doesn’t agree with that.

Jay Justice, on whether costumers who dress for charity events should only portray characters ‘accurately’ or not, with implications that ‘accuracy’ means that a non white person should limit themselves to canonical characters of color. (via msjayjustice)

Jay Justice is more Batgirl than anyone I know.

(via gailsimone)

(via gailsimone)

Ms Marvel recently went to its sixth printing, a rare accomplishment in comics today.

But chatting with Marvel executives at San Diego Comic Con I discovered more. That it sells more in digital than print, and that includes the first issue.

Relevant to something I was wondering about yesterday. (From here.)

Oh, interesting.

(via postcardsfromspace)

This makes me so, so happy. 

(via bearhatalice)

characterlikeme:

Best Panel I have ever been to, the Badass Mystery Women Panel at Nerd HQ this year. Great discussions of beinga  woman and woman of color in the entertainment industry. I’m in this video asking what tropes these ladies would like to see gone forever!

viperpilot:

Well, this is embarrassing

Left: Adrianne Palicki promo shot for NBC’s Wonder Woman.

Right: Kimberly Kane promo shot for ‘Wonder Woman XXX: An Axel Braun Parody’.

(via bookoisseur)

gailsimone:

demonsee:

Wonder Woman Cosplayed by V330 Creations, photographed by WeNeals

COLOR!
Also, man, this looks fantastic. Good job, everyone!

sooo pretty

gailsimone:

demonsee:

Wonder Woman Cosplayed by V330 Creations, photographed by WeNeals

COLOR!

Also, man, this looks fantastic. Good job, everyone!

sooo pretty

Happy Birthday Lynda Carter (July 24, 1951)

"Wonder Woman really is a phenomenon unto herself, the show and the character really has a life of its’ own. She represented, uh, hope, I think, for young women, and she also represented for young men, mind you, which I get a lot of mail on, the type of, like the perfect woman, one that could be beautiful and smart and fun and strong."

(via themarysue)

ericscissorhands:

"Some women are lost in the fire. Some women are built from it."

(via bookoisseur)

racialicious:

I lost most of my composure while interviewing this five year old Rocket cosplayer who was entirely too adorable for words. — KJ

racialicious:

I lost most of my composure while interviewing this five year old Rocket cosplayer who was entirely too adorable for words. — KJ

(via cosplayingchildren)

scishow:

explore-blog:

22 years ago today, the first photo was uploaded to the web – and it was of an all-girl science rock band from CERN, signing about colliders, quarks, and antimatter.
Oh, and they were actually really, really good.

Check out that second link for some sweet, sweet nerdy tunes!

scishow:

explore-blog:

22 years ago today, the first photo was uploaded to the web – and it was of an all-girl science rock band from CERN, signing about colliders, quarks, and antimatter.

Oh, and they were actually really, really good.

Check out that second link for some sweet, sweet nerdy tunes!

dcwomenkickingass:

Happy 4th of July America with Wonder Woman, a Feminist
Equality is a core, fundamental belief at the heart of the Declaration of Independence which was signed 228 years ago today. Yet equality seems to be a court ruling away for anyone who does not resemble those that signed out - white men.
This week saw the United States Supreme Court open the flood gates to vague religious “objections” trumping the rights of women who need perscribed drugs. 
Ruth Bader Ginsberg wrote that ”The court, I fear, has ventured into a minefield” due to the Hobby Lobby ruling.
She’s right. And that minefield will be filled with bloodied dead rights of women. And now we have seen this ruling quickly being used to enable employers to deny gays employment.
Which is why I love this portrait of Wonder Woman flying over the United States Capital. I can imagine that she’s flying to have a word with the non-female court justices who voted for the small-minded hypocrites of the Hobby Lobby. 
Of course, this won’t really happen.
Wonder Woman is, we know, a fictional creation. She and her likeness is owned by a large multinational corporation who can choose to do with her what they wish.
But you can’t have things both ways.
Wonder Woman is not just a “superhero” in the same way that Batman and Superman are. She is more than that and they know it. Her likeness is sold to hundreds of companies around the world to be emblazoned onto merchandise targeted and sold to women and girls bringing in invisible planes full of cash.
The reason they can do this and do do this is because Wonder Woman is viewed as a sign of female empowerment and equality. 
She is a symbol that says women are equal to men. 
She says that women can do what men can do.
She doesn’t Lean In, she breaks the door down and cracks the ceiling.
She is a feminist.
Denying this denies the DNA of the character.
Side-stepping this or attempting to not say “Feminist” communicates a lack of understanding of the character and suggest some concerning issues around a view of women.
This is not about one writer not saying one thing.
This is a larger issue of seeing the connection of feminism with Wonder Woman as a problem.
By not using and avoiding the word it supports the demonization of the word. It helps give life to the concept of things like “Femi-Nazi”
And people who own the character and reap the rewards of marketing that character as an embodiment of female power and equality of should realize the hypocrisy of this.
I don’t want to hear about a Wonder Woman is strong and beautiful and wise and loving and fierce without hearing the word feminist too.
I’ve heard and read some horrible things about women and the concept of feminism over the last few days both on my blog and on other sites. Not only about Wonder Woman issue but the Supreme Court’s ruling as well. 
What better way to communicate the positive aspects of feminism than to reinforce that the pop culture symbol of female empowerment is a feminist by having the executives of the company who own her simply state it.
I’ll be here waiting.

via
Portrait of Wonder Woman by Steve Rude

dcwomenkickingass:

Happy 4th of July America with Wonder Woman, a Feminist

Equality is a core, fundamental belief at the heart of the Declaration of Independence which was signed 228 years ago today. Yet equality seems to be a court ruling away for anyone who does not resemble those that signed out - white men.

This week saw the United States Supreme Court open the flood gates to vague religious “objections” trumping the rights of women who need perscribed drugs. 

Ruth Bader Ginsberg wrote that ”The court, I fear, has ventured into a minefield” due to the Hobby Lobby ruling.

She’s right. And that minefield will be filled with bloodied dead rights of women. And now we have seen this ruling quickly being used to enable employers to deny gays employment.

Which is why I love this portrait of Wonder Woman flying over the United States Capital. I can imagine that she’s flying to have a word with the non-female court justices who voted for the small-minded hypocrites of the Hobby Lobby. 

Of course, this won’t really happen.

Wonder Woman is, we know, a fictional creation. She and her likeness is owned by a large multinational corporation who can choose to do with her what they wish.

But you can’t have things both ways.

Wonder Woman is not just a “superhero” in the same way that Batman and Superman are. She is more than that and they know it. Her likeness is sold to hundreds of companies around the world to be emblazoned onto merchandise targeted and sold to women and girls bringing in invisible planes full of cash.

The reason they can do this and do do this is because Wonder Woman is viewed as a sign of female empowerment and equality. 

She is a symbol that says women are equal to men. 

She says that women can do what men can do.

She doesn’t Lean In, she breaks the door down and cracks the ceiling.

She is a feminist.

Denying this denies the DNA of the character.

Side-stepping this or attempting to not say “Feminist” communicates a lack of understanding of the character and suggest some concerning issues around a view of women.

This is not about one writer not saying one thing.

This is a larger issue of seeing the connection of feminism with Wonder Woman as a problem.

By not using and avoiding the word it supports the demonization of the word. It helps give life to the concept of things like “Femi-Nazi”

And people who own the character and reap the rewards of marketing that character as an embodiment of female power and equality of should realize the hypocrisy of this.

I don’t want to hear about a Wonder Woman is strong and beautiful and wise and loving and fierce without hearing the word feminist too.

I’ve heard and read some horrible things about women and the concept of feminism over the last few days both on my blog and on other sites. Not only about Wonder Woman issue but the Supreme Court’s ruling as well. 

What better way to communicate the positive aspects of feminism than to reinforce that the pop culture symbol of female empowerment is a feminist by having the executives of the company who own her simply state it.

I’ll be here waiting.

via

Portrait of Wonder Woman by Steve Rude